9 Popular Supplements With Potential Hidden Risks

Supplements are products designed to supplement a person’s diet by providing additional nutrients that may be lacking or insufficient in their regular diet. These supplements may come in various forms, including pills, capsules, powders, liquids, and gummies.

Some common types of supplements include vitamins, minerals, herbal and botanical extracts, amino acids, and probiotics. These supplements are typically available over-the-counter and can be purchased without a prescription.

While supplements can be beneficial for people who have specific nutrient deficiencies or dietary restrictions, it is important to note that they are not a substitute for a balanced and healthy diet. Additionally, excessive intake of certain supplements can be harmful and can cause adverse effects.

Supplements have become a popular way for people to improve their health and well-being. While many supplements can be helpful, some may have hidden dangers that people should be aware of. In this article, we will discuss the hidden risks of supplements, here are 9 supplements with hidden dangers.

Ephedra

Ephedra, also known as ma-huang, is a supplement that has been used for weight loss and energy. However, ephedra has been linked to serious health risks, including heart attacks, seizures, and even death. In fact, the FDA has banned the sale of ephedra supplements in the United States.

Kava: Overuse Can Harm Your Liver

Kava is a plant native to the South Pacific islands and is commonly used as a dietary supplement for anxiety and stress relief. However, there are potential hidden risks associated with taking kava supplements.

The most significant risk associated with kava supplements is liver toxicity. While the exact mechanism of liver toxicity is not fully understood, there have been several reported cases of liver damage and even liver failure associated with long-term use of kava supplements.

Therefore, it is important to use kava supplements only under the guidance of a healthcare provider and to avoid overuse or long-term use. Additionally, people with a history of liver problems or those who are taking medications that can harm the liver should avoid kava supplements altogether.

Other potential side effects of kava supplements may include dizziness, drowsiness, and gastrointestinal disturbances. If you experience any adverse effects while taking kava supplements, it is important to stop taking them and speak with your healthcare provider.

Calcium: The Excess May Settle in Your Arteries

Calcium is a vital mineral that plays a crucial role in maintaining healthy bones and teeth. Many people take calcium supplements to ensure they are getting enough of this important nutrient. However, excessive calcium intake can lead to health problems, including the accumulation of calcium in your arteries.

Calcium is necessary for the proper functioning of your heart, muscles, and nerves. However, too much calcium in your bloodstream can lead to the formation of calcium deposits in your arteries, a condition known as arterial calcification. This can cause your arteries to become stiff and narrow, which can lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.

Research has shown that excessive calcium intake, especially from supplements, can increase the risk of arterial calcification. A study published in the British Medical Journal found that women who took calcium supplements had a 22% increased risk of developing heart disease compared to those who did not take supplements.

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It’s important to note that the risk of arterial calcification from calcium supplements is highest in individuals who already have underlying heart disease or who have a history of smoking. Additionally, consuming calcium through dietary sources, such as dairy products and leafy greens, does not appear to increase the risk of arterial calcification. [Read: Healthy Heart, Healthy You: Discover the Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet for Women]

If you are considering taking calcium supplements, it’s important to talk to your healthcare provider first. They can help you determine the appropriate dosage and ensure that you are not at risk of developing arterial calcification. It’s also a good idea to try to get your daily calcium intake through a balanced diet, which can help you avoid the risks associated with excessive calcium supplementation.

Multivitamins and Multiminerals

Multivitamins and multiminerals are commonly used dietary supplements that are often marketed as a way to fill nutritional gaps and support overall health. While these supplements may be beneficial for some people, they are not a substitute for a healthy diet.

Research has shown that getting your vitamins and minerals from whole foods is the most effective way to ensure that you are meeting your nutritional needs. In fact, a balanced diet that includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and healthy fats can provide you with all of the vitamins and minerals your body needs to function properly.

While some people may benefit from taking a multivitamin or multimineral supplement, it’s important to remember that these supplements are not a magic bullet. Taking a supplement does not give you permission to eat a poor diet or neglect other aspects of your health, such as exercise and sleep.

Additionally, some studies have suggested that excessive intake of certain vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin A, vitamin E, and iron, can be harmful to your health. This is especially true when these nutrients are consumed in supplement form, as the body may not be able to process them as effectively as it can when they are consumed through food.

If you are considering taking a multivitamin or multimineral supplement, it’s important to talk to your healthcare provider first. They can help you determine if a supplement is necessary and recommend a product that is appropriate for your needs. Additionally, remember that a supplement should be used to complement a healthy diet, not replace it.

St. John’s Wort: Avoid Drug Interactions

St. John’s Wort is a herbal supplement that is commonly used to treat depression and anxiety. While St. John’s Wort may be effective for some people, it can also cause serious drug interactions with certain medications.

St. John’s Wort is known to increase the activity of certain enzymes in the liver, which can affect the way the body processes medications. This can lead to a decreased effectiveness of some drugs, or an increased risk of side effects.

Some of the medications that can interact with St. John’s Wort include antidepressants, birth control pills, blood thinners, and certain cancer drugs. If you are taking any medications, it’s important to talk to your healthcare provider before taking St. John’s Wort, as they can advise you on whether it is safe to take with your medications.

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Additionally, if you decide to take St. John’s Wort, it’s important to only take it as directed and to let your healthcare provider know that you are taking it. They can monitor you for any potential drug interactions or side effects.

It’s also important to note that St. John’s Wort can cause some side effects on its own, including dry mouth, dizziness, and gastrointestinal symptoms. If you experience any side effects while taking St. John’s Wort, it’s important to let your healthcare provider know.

In summary, while St. John’s Wort may be an effective treatment for depression and anxiety, it can also cause serious drug interactions with certain medications. If you are considering taking St. John’s Wort, talk to your healthcare provider first to ensure that it is safe and appropriate for you.

Vitamin D: Too Much Can Harm Your Kidneys

Vitamin D is an important nutrient that helps regulate calcium and phosphate in the body, which are essential for maintaining healthy bones, teeth, and muscles. However, excessive intake of vitamin D can be harmful and can cause various health problems, including kidney damage.

When vitamin D is consumed in excess, it can increase the levels of calcium and phosphorus in the blood, leading to a condition called hypercalcemia. This can cause damage to the kidneys by forming calcium deposits in the kidneys’ tissues, leading to kidney stones or even kidney failure. [Read: The Longevity Benefits of Different Types of Exercise]

It is important to note that vitamin D toxicity is rare and usually occurs only when taking high doses of vitamin D supplements for a prolonged period of time. Most people get enough vitamin D from sunlight and a balanced diet, and taking excessive amounts of vitamin D supplements without medical supervision is not recommended.

If you are concerned about your vitamin D levels, it is best to consult with your healthcare provider and get your levels tested. They can guide you on the appropriate amount of vitamin D supplementation based on your individual needs and help monitor for any potential side effects.

Fish Oil Supplements: Choose Fish or Flaxseed Instead

Fish oil supplements are commonly used to boost omega-3 fatty acid intake and promote heart health. However, there are some potential hidden risks associated with taking fish oil supplements.

Firstly, fish oil supplements may contain high levels of mercury and other contaminants, especially if they are sourced from fish with high levels of environmental toxins, such as mercury, PCBs, or dioxins. These contaminants can accumulate in the body over time and lead to health problems, including neurological and developmental problems. [Read: 5 Health Secrets of Drinking Wine]

Secondly, fish oil supplements can also interact with blood thinning medications, such as warfarin, and increase the risk of bleeding. Therefore, it is important to consult with a healthcare provider before taking fish oil supplements, especially if you are taking any medications or have a bleeding disorder.

Lastly, some people may experience digestive side effects, such as diarrhea or upset stomach, when taking fish oil supplements. If you experience any adverse effects while taking fish oil supplements, it is important to stop taking them and speak with your healthcare provider.

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As an alternative to fish oil supplements, flaxseed oil supplements or consuming fatty fish in moderation may be a safer and more effective way to increase omega-3 fatty acid intake.

Soy Isolate Supplements

Soy isolate is a protein supplement derived from soybeans and is commonly used by vegetarians and vegans as a source of protein. While soy isolate is generally safe for most people, there are some potential hidden risks associated with soy isolate supplements, particularly with regard to their potential estrogenic effects.

Soy contains compounds called phytoestrogens, which can mimic the effects of estrogen in the body. While phytoestrogens have been shown to have some health benefits, such as reducing the risk of certain cancers and improving bone health, there is some concern that excessive consumption of soy isolate supplements may lead to adverse effects related to estrogenic activity.[Read: Type 2 Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes and Diagnosis]

For example, men who consume excessive amounts of soy isolate supplements may experience a decrease in testosterone levels and may also experience symptoms related to estrogen dominance, such as breast enlargement and decreased libido. Women who consume excessive amounts of soy isolate supplements may also experience adverse effects related to estrogenic activity, such as menstrual irregularities and breast tenderness.

Therefore, it is important to use soy isolate supplements in moderation and to speak with a healthcare provider before using them, especially if you have a history of hormonal imbalances or are taking medications that affect hormone levels. It is also important to note that consuming whole soy foods, such as tofu and edamame, may have less of an estrogenic effect than consuming soy isolate supplements due to the presence of other compounds that can counteract the estrogenic effects of soy.

 

Final Thoughts

In conclusion, supplements can be beneficial for people who have specific nutrient deficiencies or dietary restrictions, but they also carry potential hidden risks. It is important to speak with a healthcare provider before starting any supplement regimen, as some supplements can interact with medications and may not be safe for people with certain medical conditions. Additionally, excessive intake of certain supplements can be harmful and can cause adverse effects. Therefore, it is important to choose supplements from reputable brands and manufacturers and to follow the recommended dosages and usage instructions. Finally, it is important to maintain a balanced and healthy diet to ensure adequate intake of essential nutrients. [Read: 8 Home Remedies for Itching in Private Parts]

Resources

  1. Fish oil supplements:
  • Mozaffarian, D. (2016). Fish oil and marine omega-3 fatty acids. Circulation, 134(2), 154-166.
  • Kris-Etherton, P. M., Harris, W. S., & Appel, L. J. (2002). Fish consumption, fish oil, omega-3 fatty acids, and cardiovascular disease. Circulation, 106(21), 2747-2757.
  • American Heart Association. (2017). Fish and omega-3 fatty acids.
  1. Kava supplements:
  • Sarris, J., Stough, C., Bousman, C. A., Wahid, Z. T., Murray, G., Teschke, R., & Savage, K. M. (2013). Kava in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 33(5), 643-648.
  • Teschke, R. (2010). Kava hepatotoxicity–a clinical review. Annals of hepatology, 9(3), 251-265.
  • National Institutes of Health. (2022). Kava.
  1. Soy isolate supplements:
  • Messina, M., & Messina, V. (2010). The role of soy in vegetarian diets. Nutrients, 2(8), 855-888.
  • Hamilton-Reeves, J. M., Vazquez, G., Duval, S. J., Phipps, W. R., Kurzer, M. S., & Messina, M. J. (2010). Clinical studies show no effects of soy protein or isoflavones on reproductive hormones in men: results of a meta-analysis. Fertility and sterility, 94(3), 997-1007.
  • American Institute for Cancer Research. (2022). Soy and health.

 

 

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